Global Study from WIEGO Network Reveals How People Living Off Waste Improve Cities

New research released today – ahead of International Waste Pickers’ Day on March 1 – highlights the role and impact of those who make a living from what others throw away. The study challenges the common view that waste pickers have no place in modern solid waste management systems.

Women in Informal Employment  - Globalizing and Organizing
Waste pickers are among the most invisible workers in the informal economy and often work in deplorable conditions. The study shows how waste pickers in five developing countries play a role in keeping cities clean and highlights the challenges they face in recovering recyclable materials.

In cities where local governments have provided better access to recyclables, integrated waste pickers into formal solid waste management systems and provided protected spaces for sorting and baling waste, waste pickers have report higher earnings, improved door-to-door waste removal services, savings to municipal coffers and reduction in on-the-job health issues.

However, waste pickers in all five study cities – Belo Horizonte, Brazil; Bogota, Colombia; Pune, India; Nakuru, Kenya; and Durban, South Africa – reported significant challenges. Study respondents experienced increased competition from other waste pickers, a reduction in prices for recyclables, and stigmatization and harassment.

These challenges impact family well-being in countries where waste picking is the only work option for many poor people. In Pune, India, for example, waste picking is the main source of household income for 85 per cent of waste pickers’ households. Only 25 per cent of respondents reported having another work activity, indicating the relevance of waste picking as a main source of income.

With the exception of Durban, none of the cities reported formal wage employment as their primary household earnings. Households in some cities received additional income from government grants, illustrating the need for a cushion to fall back on in times of instability.

“Waste pickers are closely linked to local governments and to the urban economy,” says Sonia Dias, Waste Picker Sector Specialist of Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO), who co-authored the study with Melanie Samson, WIEGO’s Africa Waste Sector Specialist. “Formally integrating waste pickers into the solid waste management system makes sense because, in many cities, these workers are the ones who are already providing the only collection of household refuse.”

The study findings imply that policymakers should devise better programmes to reduce vulnerability in workers’ lives, create opportunities to integrate waste pickers into formal systems, and effectively protect basic rights to pursue waste as a livelihood. It also recommends that cities address the vulnerabilities of waste pickers and the households that depend on their earnings by:
Considering the technical capacities and capabilities of waste pickers in solid waste services to support productivity in the informal economy;

  • Developing a system whereby waste pickers are allowed access to recyclables;
  • Providing infrastructure to conduct recycling activities;
  • Carrying out educational campaigns to change stigmas against informal workers; and
  • Working with waste picker organizations to identify a holistic approach to formalization, including offering capacity training and management courses to improve waste pickers’ skills.

About the Study: The Informal Economy Monitoring Study (IEMS) examines working conditions in the informal economy for home-based workers, street vendors, and waste pickers in 10 cities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. For the waste-related segment of the IEMS, WIEGO, which led the study, collaborated with local partner organizations of informal workers in five cities: Asociación de Recicladores de Bogotá (ARB); Instituto Nenuca de Desenvolvimento Sustentável – INSEA and the waste pickers’ networks Redesol and Cataunidos in Belo Horizonte; Asiye eTafuleni in Durban; the Kenya National Alliance of Street Vendors and Informal Traders (KENASVIT) in Nakuru; and the waste pickers’ union Kagad Kach Patra Kashtakari Panchayat (KKPKP) in Pune. The Waste Picker Sector Report, an executive summary, and additional information can be found at www.wiego.org.

About WIEGO
About WIEGO: Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO) is a global action research-policy network that seeks to improve the status of the working poor, especially women, in the informal economy. It does so by highlighting the informal economy through improved statistics and research; by helping to strengthen member-based organizations of informal workers; and by promoting policy dialogues and processes that include informal workers. Visit www.wiego.org for more information.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/2852953#ixzz44OvsU8Wu

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

Iraqi children scavenge for a living – Photo Journal

The original post and photo journalism was done by Sebation Castelier of Al Jazeera.  My great thanks and appreciation for this article and these photos.

This is the situation that Green fire is addressing through  the "Children of the Landfill" project. It is not just a problem in Iraq it is every country and just outside every city. Open landfills effect one half of the world's population, 3.5 billion people.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

Original article:
http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpictures/2016/03/iraqi-children-scavenge-living-160321112736752.html

After fleeing from ISIL, dozens of young Iraqis spend their days searching through rubbish heaps for valuable scraps.

Sebastian Castelier | 28 Mar 2016 07:38 GMT | Poverty & Development, War & Conflict, Humanitarian crises, Middle East, Iraq

Standing next to a pile of rubbish as high as a hill, Ali, a 12-year-old child from Mosul, looks excitedly at his latest discovery.

"They say it's expired, but I am still eating it," he says, popping a strawberry candy into his mouth.

Like Ali, dozens of displaced Iraqi children who fled from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as ISIS) group are now working in a massive landfill site 15km outside of Erbil, the capital of Iraq's Kurdish region. They scavenge their way through tonnes of rubbish to collect plastic and metal to sell to recycling plants, making between 10,000 and 30,000 Iraqi dinars ($9 to $27) a day.

"This is not an appropriate place for children, but they are forced to do it," landfill supervisor Ali Hessah told Al Jazeera, noting he leaves the gates of his dump site open so that displaced children and their parents can work.

"This is not a life, but we have no choice," said Ahmed, 16, who fled Mosul a year and a half ago. No longer in school, Ahmed and his 12-year-old brother are now among the children who scavenge for a living.

"'My parents told me that terrorists came, so we fled,' explained a young scavenger from Mosul. Like dozens of other children, he now works at the Kani Qirzhala dump site, 15km outside of Erbil.
[Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"Iraq's Kurdish region is home to two million internally displaced persons who fled from ISIL.
[Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"Ahmed, 16, fled Mosul with his parents and his 12-year-old brother the day before ISIL overran their city. He works at the landfill nearly every day, from 8am to 2 or 3pm. 'When they take back Mosul, I will be the first to go,' he said, adding he wants to become a doctor. [Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"Many displaced Iraqis arrived in 2014, when ISIL seized large swaths of territory in northern Iraq, including Mosul and Sinjar. [Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"A month ago, Hussein Hamid's two sons, Ali, 13, and Taha, 12, joined him to work in the landfill. 'Because of our situation, I had to take them out of school so they could help,' he said.
[Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"For a large proportion of internally displaced children who are not living in camps, access to education is limited because of school-related costs, as well as a lack of Arabic-language instruction.
[Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"The Kurdistan Regional Government [KRG] requires children to attend school for nine years, typically up to age 15. But under Iraq's education law, children are required to attend school for six years, typically up to age 12. This double standard makes children aged 12 to 15 particularly vulnerable to exploitative child labour practices inside Iraq's Kurdish region, as they are not required to be in school but are not legally permitted to work either. [Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"According to the UN children's fund, UNICEF, law enforcement agencies in Iraq have taken action to combat child labour in all forms, but the KRG does not enforce some of the central government's laws.
[Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"Along with plastic, Shalan, a 12-year-old from Anbar province, also sometimes collects food. 'If it's still closed, it's still good,' he said, holding a loaf of bread wrapped in a plastic bag. Cheese was the best food he ever found, he added. [Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"Ahmed, a 16-year-old from Mosul, says competition can sometimes be high between the young workers, noting one of them 'kicks us and steals our plastic'. [Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"'This is not a place for kids, but what can we do?' asked Delal, a Yazidi woman from Sinjar, whose young nephews and nieces all work in the landfill. Four of her family members were taken by ISIL.
[Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"'There weren't a lot of people before, but after the war, a lot more arrived,' said Ali Hessah, the landfill supervisor. 'They are not supposed to come here, but we let them because of their situation.' He says he has seen rag-pickers as young as four or five years old. [Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"At the end of the day, the scavengers sell their findings to a recycling factory. One factory located near the landfill buys plastic for 100,000 Iraqi dinars ($90) a tonne. [Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"Naswan, the director of a local recycling plant, says he collects four tonnes of second-hand plastic a day, a quarter of which comes from Kani Qirzhala. 'It's saddening to see children working in the landfill. They are not supposed to work there, but the refugees need the money,' he says. [Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

"Once it is shredded into chips, the plastic is sold for between $100 and $200 per tonne. According to Naswan, 100 tonnes of plastic is shipped every month from his factory to other regions in Iraq, as well as to Turkey and Iran. [Sebastian Castelier/Al Jazeera]"

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

Cambodia: CHILDREN OF THE DUMP [video]

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation has made it  a mission to assist and improve the ives of the Children of the Dump.

This video was Uploaded on Jul 18, 2008, there has been no assistance and no help.

In countries around the world, hundreds of thousands of poor people face daily hazards to earn meager livings by scavenging for recyclable goods. In Cambodia, hundreds of scavenger families find their lives changing – they will lose their homes and livelihoods when the government closes the dump where they work. Rory Byrne has this report from Phnom Penh. Officially, it is the Steung Meanchey landfill site, but those who live here call it Smokey Mountain. Steung Meanchey dump is a seven-hectare mountain of smoking garbage on the outskirts of the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh. Here some 2,000 workers, including about 600 children, sift through 700 tons of garbage a day.

In developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, garbage scavengers are among the poorest workers. In Cambodia, they typically earn about one dollar a day. Ten-year-old Ya has been recycling bottles and cans at the dump for three years. He says the situation here is terrible. He has to get up very early to work and finishes late in the evening. Ya says his life is very difficult. Collecting garbage brings him less than $1 a day which is not nearly enough to cover his expenses. Most of the scavengers live in wooden shacks around the dump. There is no access to clean water or sanitation and epidemics are commonplace.

The risks here are high. Sharp-edged metals and broken glass leave nasty wounds. And garbage scavengers suffer high rates of serious diseases, such as hepatitis, tuberculosis and even AIDS. A number of scavengers have been killed or seriously injured when they were run over by garbage trucks. She says it is very dangerous to work here – people can step on metal shards or nails for example or get hit and crushed by the dump trucks. She says she has injured herself with many things, like old needles.

Annette Jensen is the director of A New Day, a charity that provides free food, shelter and schooling to more than 100 children from Steung Meanchey dump.

"To see the children miserable, dirty, sad looking at the garbage dump and then have them arrive with their little plastic bag with all their belongings and move into the center. And to see their excitement about taking a shower. To see their excitement about getting their little bag of shampoo. And to see them clean, putting on their school uniform and going to school has just been amazing," says Jensen. But most of those working on Cambodia's landfills are not so lucky, and for children like Ya, going to school remains a distant dream,

Ya has he would go to school if he could stop working at the dump. He says he wants to go to school but cannot because his family is so poor.

Ya and his family now face a new challenge: the government plans to close Steung Meanchey and relocate the 535 families living there to land about 50 kilometers south of Phnom Penh.

The government will let them have tiny plots on which to build new homes. An official in charge of the project notes the location is near Udong Mountain, a tourist site, so that there are jobs available in the region. And he says, families are not being forced to move, but most are volunteering.

Still, no families have left so far. Many scavengers say they will be happy to leave the dump, but they are worried that they will not be able to make a living because the relocation camp is too far away from the city. By Rory Byrne, Phnom Penh.

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

Storks give up migration for landfill junk food

Global environmental change and human-made pollution have changed the migration routes of birds, especially storks, according to a new study from the University of East Anglia (UAE).
Storks stop migtating stop at landfill
An increasing number of storks no longer migrate from Europe to Africa for the winter, but instead many live in Spain and Portugal the whole year round – feeding on "junk food" from landfill sites, reported the university in a press statement. Addicted to junk food and making round-trips of almost 100 kilometers to get their fix, white storks are now residents, nesting and living near landfill sites all year round. The research team tracked 48 birds using GPS tracking devices which transmit their positions five times a day. "We found that the landfill sites enable year-round nest use, which is an entirely new behavior that has developed very recently. This strategy enables the resident birds to select the best nest sites and to start breeding earlier," said lead researcher Aldina Franco, from UEA's School of Environmental Sciences. Franco also said that the stork population in Portugal has increased 10 times over the last 20 years.

"These are exciting times to study animal migration. Several species, including the white stork, which used to be fully migratory in Europe, now have resident populations. We want to understand the causes and the mechanisms behind these changes in migratory behavior," Franco further said. Researchers fear that the closure of landfills, as stated in the EU Landfill Directives, may have a dramatic effect on their population.

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

Waste Not, Want Not – Solid Waste at the Heart of Sustainable Development [video]

Waste Not, Want Not – Solid Waste at the Heart of Sustainable Development March 3, 2016

For the residents of Rosario, Argentina, good solid waste management means more than just a clean city. Rosario’s approach to garbage has improved the economy and environment with, according to the city’s mayor, “a direct impact on what matters most: the quality of life of urban residents.”

“We’ve tried to be one step ahead, taking on the challenge to innovate while looking for solutions,” said Rosario Mayor Monica Fein, “Our introduction of modernized collection services has resulted in a profound change in the city’s landscape. “

A generation ago, many cities around the world didn't have comprehensive solid waste management programs. Organic waste was feed to animals and packaging waste hardly existed. But today, due to growing populations, rapid urbanization and economic development, managing trash has become one of the most pressing issues facing the planet.

In 2012, the World Bank sounded the alarm in its flagship report “What a Waste”, predicting a 70% increase in urban garbage by the year 2025. That same year, the critically acclaimed documentary “Trashed” gave viewers an in-depth look at the scope of the global garbage crisis.

Trashed (Trailer) – Environmental Documentary Jeremy Irons Narrates 2:06

“Trashed” is a provocative investigation of one of the fastest growing industries in North America. The garbage business. The film examines a fundamental element of modern American culture…the disposal of what our society defines as “waste.” It is an issue influenced by every American, most of whom never consider the consequences. Nor, it seems, the implications to our biosphere. At times humorous, but deeply poignant, “Trashed” examines the American waste stream fast approaching a half billion tons annually.

What are the effects all this waste will have on already strained natural resources? Why is so much of it produced? While every American creates almost 5 pounds of it every day, who is affected most? And who wants America to make more?

The film analyzes the causes and effects of the seemingly innocuous act of “taking out the garbage” while showcasing the individuals, activists,corporate and advocacy groups working to affect change and reform the current model. “Trashed” is an informative and thought-provoking film everyone interested in the future of sustainability should see.

 

Cities at the center

Since the responsibility for solid waste management usually falls on the shoulders of municipalities, it’s no surprise that the issue tops the agenda of mayors in rich and poor countries alike, according to Ede Illjasz-Vasquez, Senior Director for the World Bank’s Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience Global Practice.

“Without good solid waste management, you can’t build a sustainable and livable city,” he said. “It’s not just about technical solutions. There are climatehealth, andsafety impacts, as well as important social considerations, from the inclusion of waste pickers to changing behavior so people and societies are encouraged to reduce and recycle waste. ”

Read full story: http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2016/03/03/waste-not-want-not—solid-waste-at-the-heart-of-sustainable-development.print

 

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

Informal Workers’ Access to Healthcare [video]

Published on Jul 27, 2015

 This video by WIEGO and partners, Asiye eTafuleni(AeT) in South Africa; HomeNet Thailand; and the Self-Employed Women's Association in India tells the stories of informal workers and the difficulties they face in accessing health services in their respective countries. It also presents some of the solutions that each of these organizations has developed to mitigate against these barriers to access.
If you are interested in learning more on this topic, please read the accompanying post on our blog: http://wiego.org/blog/informal-worker…

 

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

The girl who silenced the world for 5 minutes

Ask yourself this question, have we done enough?

If you listen to this now 24 year old talk given in 1992 then listen to the 2nd video in the linked article you will understand the motivation of Green Fire Engineered Reclamation to assist the Children of the Landfill.

~

“I’m only a child, yet I know that we’re all in this together and should act as one single world towards one single goal.” –12-year-old Severn Cullis-Suzuki speaking at the 1992 UN Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.

 Hello, I’m Severn Suzuki speaking for E.C.O. – The Environmental Children’s Organisation. We are a group of twelve and thirteen-year-olds from Canada trying to make a difference: Vanessa Suttie, Morgan Geisler, Michelle Quigg and me. We raised all the money ourselves to come six thousand miles to tell you adults you must change your ways. Coming here today, I have no hidden agenda. I am fighting for my future.

    Losing my future is not like losing an election or a few points on the stock market. I am here to speak for all generations to come. I am here to speak on behalf of the starving children around the world whose cries go unheard. I am here to speak for the countless animals dying across this planet because they have nowhere left to go. We cannot afford to not be heard.

    I am afraid to go out in the sun now because of the holes in the ozone. I am afraid to breathe the air because I don’t know what chemicals are in it. I used to go fishing in Vancouver with my dad until just a few years ago we found the fish full of cancers. And now we hear about animals and plants going extinct every day – vanishing forever. In my life, I have dreamt of seeing the great herds of wild animals, jungles and rainforests full of birds and butterflies, but now I wonder if they will even exist for my children to see. Did you have to worry about these little things when you were my age? All this is happening before our eyes and yet we act as if we have all the time we want and all the solutions. I’m only a child and I don’t have all the solutions, but I want you to realise, neither do you!

    You don’t know how to fix the holes in our ozone layer. You don’t know how to bring salmon back up a dead stream. You don’t know how to bring back an animal now extinct. And you can’t bring back forests that once grew where there is now desert. If you don’t know how to fix it, please stop breaking it!

    Here, you may be delegates of your governments, business people, organisers, reporters or politicians – but really you are mothers and fathers, brothers and sister, aunts and uncles – and all of you are somebody’s child. I’m only a child yet I know we are all part of a family, five billion strong, in fact, 30 million species strong and we all share the same air, water and soil – borders and governments will never change that. I’m only a child yet I know we are all in this together and should act as one single world towards one single goal. In my anger, I am not blind, and in my fear, I am not afraid of telling the world how I feel.

    In my country, we make so much waste, we buy and throw away, buy and throw away, buy and throw away, and yet northern countries will not share with the needy. Even when we have more than enough, we are afraid to share, we are afraid to let go of some of our wealth. In Canada, we live the privileged life, with plenty of food, water and shelter – we have watches, bicycles, computers and television sets. The list could go on for two days.

    Two days ago here in Brazil, we were shocked when we spent some time with some children living on the streets. And this is what one child told us: “I wish I was rich and if I were, I would give all the street children food, clothes, medicine, shelter and love and affection.” If a child on the street who has nothing, is willing to share, why are we who have everything still so greedy?

    I can’t stop thinking that these children are my age, that it makes a tremendous difference where you are born, that I could be one of those children living in the Favelas of Rio; I could be a child starving in Somalia; a victim of war in the Middle East or a beggar in India. I’m only a child yet I know if all the money spent on war was spent on ending poverty and finding environmental answers, what a wonderful place this earth would be!

    At school, even in kindergarten, you teach us how to behave in the world. You teach us: not to fight with others, to work things out, to respect others, to clean up our mess, not to hurt other creatures to share – not be greedy. Then why do you go out and do the things you tell us not to do? Do not forget why you’re attending these conferences, who you’re doing this for – we are your own children. You are deciding what kind of world we are growing up in. Parents should be able to comfort their children by saying “everything’s going to be alright’, “we’re doing the best we can” and “it’s not the end of the world”.

    But I don’t think you can say that to us anymore. Are we even on your list of priorities? My father always says “You are what you do, not what you say.” Well, what you do makes me cry at night. You grown ups say you love us. I challenge you, please make your actions reflect your words. Thank you for listening.

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

The Power to Dream The Power of Unity [VIDEO]

The Power to Dream The Power of Unity [VIDEO]

Produced by Global Communities http://www.globalcommunities.org November 3rd, 2015

Presented by Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

 

Ana Heidy Ambrosio, a resident of Corn Island in Nicaragua, lived a life of isolation and marginalization until she was 15 years old. She was born deaf, and the other members of her family weren’t able to understand her special needs. Her inability to communicate with others made Ana a shy and unhappy girl.

The lack of educational opportunities for deaf people on Corn Island made Ana’s isolation even worse. Her family, trying to protect her, would keep her inside of the home.

But Ana’s life changed when her grandmother, Romelia Dixon, attended a Municipal Governance Program (MGP) workshop implemented by the partner organization FECONORI. The initiative seeks to increase citizen participation by People with Disabilities (PwD) and their organizations in order to improve efforts to advocate for disabled people’s rights. Ana’s grandmother found out during the workshop that the project would be providing the island’s first sign language courses.

This project, implemented by Global Communities as part of USAID’s MGP, represents the first initiative on Corn Island to provide support to PwD.

Ana was one of 24 deaf people that participated in the 15-day intensive sign language course. It was the first time in her life that she met other deaf people. The course had an immediate impact on Ana. She learned to communicate with others, her shyness faded away, and her humor and attitude have greatly improved. “I’ve changed because I feel more confident,” Ana said as she demonstrated the signs she now uses to communicate with those around her.

As they got to know each other better, the participants in the sign language course, with the support of MGP, decided to found a chapter of the National Association of Deaf Nicaraguans (ANSNIC) in Corn Island. Along with other PwDs, the members of ANSNIC began to learn about their rights as established by national and international law. Through the this project, the participants gained tools to help them more effectively advocate for recognition of their rights and strengthen their organizations.

Over the past 14 months, MGP worked with other PwDs, which led to the creation of the Association of People with Physical and Mobility Impairments (ADIFIM), the Organization of Blind Nicaraguans (OCN), and the Association of Mothers and Fathers of Disabled Children, “Los Pipitos.” These organizations are now advocating for public policies that address the needs of the disabled population.

Ana is a member of ANSNIC and is heavily involved in the organization’s activities. Along with her colleagues, she successfully petitioned the mayor’s office to provide a classroom for continued sign language classes. Since then, 24 people have been receiving sign language classes three times a week. The mayor’s office also agreed to provide a stipend for the sign language instructor.

About Global Communities

Global Communities is an international non-profit organization that works closely with communities worldwide to bring about sustainable changes that improve the lives and livelihoods of the vulnerable. Development is not something we do for people; it is something we do with them. We believe that the people who understand their needs best are the people of the community itself.

We make a difference by engaging with communities, governments, the private sector and NGOs as partners for good – bringing together complementary strengths and shared responsibilities to work toward common goals. We envision a world where everyone has the freedom, means and ability to live and prosper with dignity.

Global Communities has existed for 60 years. Most recently we have been known as CHF International and, before that, the Cooperative Housing Foundation. We began in 1952 as the Foundation for Cooperative Housing.

Note: Just in case you may have missed any of my previous blog posts, I post here on one of my active projects. It is a new social network for entrepreneurs, completely free, and very unique. It could be a great thing for your business. It is called MarketHive. Just click —-> HERE <—- to find out more.

If you are interested in participating in this effort to lift these children to inspiration, please join me in the Markethive group “Green Fire”. It is from here that we will start a crowd funding campaign to aid Green Fire in its mission – The Children of the Landfill.

 

We commemorate International Waste Pickers Day

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation salutes Globarec for its contributions to the welfare of more than 20 million people engaged in recycling in the world.

Green Fire is here to make it better.

This hugh work force is mostly invisible but they are there all the time picking up after us.

The Global Alliance of Waste Pickers is a networking process supported by WIEGO, among thousands of waste picker organizations with groups in more than 28 countries covering mainly Latin America, Asia and Africa.

From the Globalrec.com newsletter.

Today, March 1, we commemorate International Waste Pickers’ Day in remembrance of our compañeros who were brutally assassinated in the Universidad Libre de Barranquilla (Colombia) in 1992. That terrible day, waste pickers were tricked by personnel from the Universidad Libre de Barranquilla, who invited them to enter into the premises of the university under the pretense of providing them with recyclable materials. Once inside they were beaten and shot to death so that their bodies could be used for research and organ trafficking. The tragedy was denounced by a survivor, who during the attack pretended to be dead and later escaped.

According to the ILO, there are more than 20 million people engaged in recycling in the world. In each country our sector has unique story.

We are on the lookout for legislative changes that are taking place in several parts of the world attempting to leave the management of recycling in the hands of private companies, excluding waste pickers and their organizations. This is the case in Turkey where the Environmental Law whereby the purchase of materials from waste pickers is not legal was approved. This affects 500,000 people that make a living by picking waste.

Let’s commemorate this day by raising the flags of the cartoneros in favor of the recognition of our profession and work conditions, just as any other worker (minimum wage, social rights, social and health protection, and recognition of our organizations as legitimate).

¡Si tocan a uno nos tocan a todos!

Colombia, USA, France, Ecuador, Uruguay, Argentina.

Federación Argentina de Cartoneros y Recicladores (FACyR) – Argentina
ARB – Asociación de Recicladores de Bogotá – Colombia.
RENARC – Red Nacional de Recicladores del Ecuador – Ecuador.
Sure We Can – USA.
Association AMELIOR – France.
UCRUS – Unión de Clasificadores de Residuos Urbanos Sólidos – Uruguay.


 

Women of the Landfill – Entrepreneurs

SEWA- Self Employed Women's Association

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation has recognized this organization for its work with “women of the landfill” waste pickers. They work at the bottom of society, neglected, abused and like most people's awareness of waste, they are invisible.

An interesting fact about the the global society, 1% of the population of every major global metropolitan area are waste pickers.

Green Fire is joining the global networks that are focused on securing livelihoods for the working poor, especially women, in the informal economy.

“Informal workers need voice, visibility and validity.” WIEGO.

Green Fire creates change by building capability among informal worker organizations, expanding the knowledge base, and influencing local, national and international policies.

The informal economy includes workers who do not have employment-based social protection and enterprises which are not incorporated or registered.

Green Fire is designed to contribute directly to these organizations, We provide complete autonomous villages, with electrical micro-grid, clean water and housing manufactured on site by the Pickers themselves. We do all of this with the by-products from the Green Fire processing of the landfill.

Just as importantly, Green Fire puts every “Picker” to work doing basically the same activity they regularly do in a more advantageous and safe way.

Women of the Landfill

The women of SEWA are what we at Green Fire recognize as true entrepreneurs striving to capitalize (survive) on the only opportunities they have, waste from the streets and landfill.

These women entrepreneurs don't have visions of 6 zeros ($X,000,000) behind their names or anything else of this material magnitude. They spell success like this – SURVIVAL.

At the end of the day a “little success” for these women is a smile from their children.

Green Fire is designed to support these entrepreneurs. We support and contribute to the “green livelihood” they have created for themselves..

This video introduces the human side of the Green Fire landfill mining mission and their conditions.

Taken from the SEWA website:
“SEWA is a trade union registered in 1972. It is an organisation of poor, self-employed women workers. These are women who earn a living through their own labour or small businesses. They do not obtain regular salaried employment with welfare benefits like workers in the organised sector. They are the unprotected labour force of our country. Constituting 93% of the labour force, these are workers of the unorganised sector. Of the female labour force in India, more than 94% are in the unorganised sector. However their work is not counted and hence remains invisible. In fact, women workers themselves remain uncounted, undercounted and invisible.
SEWA’s main goals are to organise women workers for full employment.

SEWA is both an organisation and a movement. The SEWA movement is enhanced by its being a sangam or confluence of three movements : the labour movement, the cooperative movement and the women’s movement. But it is also a movement of self-employed workers : their own, home-grown movement with women as the leaders. Through their own movement women become strong and visible. Their tremendous economic and social contributions become recognized with globalization, liberalization and other economic changes, there are both new opportunities as well as threats to some traditional areas of employment.”

The video is produced by SEWA Video studio and successfully depicts the plight of the informal worker in India. Its 10:42 long.

Waste Pickers' – Life & Livelihood

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