Children refugees from Myanmar tell of trauma

Rohingya refugees from Myanmar tell of trauma

Some hid in rice fields, others ate only leaves while making the long journey by foot across the border into Bangladesh.

New arrivals are grateful for whatever support they can find [Mohammad Ponir Hossain/Reuters]

Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh – Outside this town by the Bay of Bengal, we kept bumping into fresh arrivals when we visited the camps for Rohingya refugees fleeing a security crackdown in neighbouring Myanmar.

Many of them said they were from the village of Kearipara in Myanmar. From the sounds of it, that village has been utterly devastated.

All of them shared similar stories: watching family members get murdered, hiding without eating for days, and having their homes burned down.

Several told us about having to sell their valuables – rings, piercings, earrings, whatever they had on them – to facilitate a safe passage into Bangladesh.

The route, which was always difficult and deadly, has become even more problematic.

After thousands of Rohingya were found stranded and starving off the coast of southern Thailand in the middle of last year, widespread international coverage forced the hands of governments of the region to crack down on a network of human traffickers who were exploiting the desperate refugees for cash.

But those very traffickers were also paradoxically the Muslim Rohingya's only hope to make it out of predominantly Buddhist Myanmar and get on the circuitous trek that would take them through Bangladesh and Thailand into the relatively safe haven of Malaysia.

Now, just getting across the border to Bangladesh is a tough proposition for the Rohingya.

The refugees we met described hiding in rice fields for days. Some didn't eat. Others ate only leaves they found in the forests on the hills surrounding the border.

 

They advanced a few minutes at a time, taking care to stop and check every few hundred metres to make sure the Myanmar army or border guards weren't lying in wait – making a long journey by foot even longer.

Arriving in Bangladesh didn't mean the ordeal was over. If they were caught by the authorities, some would be allowed through by the border guards, others would be turned back.

Every few hundred metres there were checkpoints manned by armed patrols. Next to each of them would be one or two Rohingya families who'd been caught.

Would the soldiers show clemency? Or would they be returned to the heart of the violence they were fleeing? They sat by the side of the road, unsure of their fate.

Tens of thousands have managed to get into Bangladesh. Many of them are in the unofficial Rohingya refugee camps near the tourist town of Cox's Bazar.

Their hosts are refugees themselves with little to offer in terms of food or shelter.

But the community was pulling together to do what they could, faced with the suffering of their fellow Rohingya.

The new arrivals were grateful for whatever support they could find, but seething with resentment at the lack of action by the international community.

Ethnic cleansing proof

As far as they are concerned, the world has decided that the Rohingya are expendable.

From the Bangladesh side of the border, the evidence of what the UN has called a campaign of ethnic cleansing in Myanmar seems strong.

Aung San Suu Kyi, in response, has said that blame shouldn't be cast until all the facts are known.

That's fair enough.

But one of the known facts is that the Myanmar government won't let journalists or independent observers enter the areas where large-scale violence is believed to be taking place.

Why keep journalists out if Myanmar authorities have nothing to hide?

  by 

 

 

 

Mike Prettyman,
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
For more information come to the website

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Green Fire On The Blockchain

Green Fire On The Blockchain

Green Fire has decided to change the world as you know it. We are moving together onto the blockchain. We have chosen “Green Fire Gold” (GFG) as the blockchain application name. GFG will be the first to take landfill mining and reclamation on to the blockchain.

GFG is designed with next generation high load blockchain protocols, utilizing a blockchain design that improves functionality with each additional user, maximizing scalability and load performance.

GFG includes your own private universal wallet that allows for immediate trading and exchange between all currencies and investment markets.

The GFG blockchain is designed by the best in cryptocurrency development to create a coin and mainstream payment network usable by everyone in the world.

The GFG universal wallet/coin combo can be used to manage your entire life and assets. Inside are a Universal Dapp store (decentralized application store), micro-services, micro-payments, smart contracts, universal exchange, universal payment system, and custom template decentralized app building, just to name a few.

Understanding blockchain

The Blockchain has become the default backbone for most new financial and business development.

In essence, blockchain is a distributed database, or "timestamp server," as it was called by the mysterious Satoshi Nakamoto in the paper that proposed bitcoin.

The blockchain consists of blocks of data — each block is a timestamped batch of valid individual transactions and the hash of the previous block, creating a link between the two. Because each timestamp includes the previous timestamp in its hash, it forms a chain. Each new transaction must be authenticated across the distributed network of computers that form the blockchain before it can form the next block in the chain.

GFG is developing a fully decentralized, leaderless DAO*, a Decentralized Autonomous Organization, and a fully distributed financial platform, OWNED BY THE PEOPLE WHO USE IT.

GFG is using the MyCryptoWorld development platform to construct the GFG DAO. This platform develops on an advanced Ethereum blockchain.

For the determination phase of implementation an interdisciplinary team of cryptocurrency, marketing and software veterans/enthusiasts around the globe have already started determining the intelligence that operates GFG.

As soon the business determination is finished the whole system will be completely community/user driven and owned. From this point on the further evolution will be in the hands of all owners, using e-Governance/voting and other cutting edge tools to create consensus and run decisions.

The GFG DAO is a digital decentralized autonomous organization and a form of investor-directed venture capital fund.

The GFG DAO has an objective to provide a new decentralized business model for organizing both international commerce and social marketing. It will be on the Ethereum blockchain, and will have no conventional management structure or board of directors.

The GFG DAO is stateless, and not tied to any particular nation state. As a result, many questions of how government regulators would deal with a stateless fund are yet to be dealt with.

The GFG DAO is being crowdfunded via a token sale. A similar crowdfunding campaign in May 2016. It set the record for the largest crowdfunding campaign in history

OWNED BY THE PEOPLE WHO USE IT

The Landfill Pickers and the Women Informal Workers will own GFG. GFG will be governed by consensus.

Consensus in a distributed system is determined by entities checking each other's work and providing a stamp of approval as to transactions and activities allowed. This is accomplished through a distributed network, one might say, a “social neural network”.

Smart Contracts

GFG Blockchain also leverages a technology called "smart contracts," which are bits of executable code that only act when specific conditions within the blockchain are met. This allows a blockchain to automate activity like payment transfers when a task is completed, or even a partial payment when a milestone is achieved.

By providing a way to record transactions as automated trusted activity among digitally networked peers, audit and professional services firm Ernst & Young believes "blockchain technology has the potential to streamline and accelerate business processes, increase cybersecurity and reduce or eliminate the roles of trusted intermediaries (or centralized authorities) in industry after industry."

Blockchains have proven that they reduce cost and increase trust in financial transactions. It is becoming apparent that we can expect financial services firms to abandon existing transaction-processing technologies in favor of blockchain technologies.

We are developing the GFG DAO on the blockchain with a unique crypto token (coin) and its own brand of distributed manufacturing and ecommerce.

Green Fire is taking the Landfill Mining operations and the Children of the Landfill project and wrapping them in a blockchain application.

This will provide these “invisible workers” the very poorest of the poor the most unique democratic environment that is yet to prevail for them. They will be the next global cultural warriors to emerge from the shadows.

Mike Prettyman,
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
For more information come to the website

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The Ultimate Disruption in the Financial System – Blockchain Technology

The Ultimate Disruption in the Financial System – Blockchain Technology

Extracted from BBVA Research on Digital Banking.

What is Blockchain?

Blockchain is a peer-to-peer public ledger maintained by a distributed network of computers that requires no central authority or third party intermediaries. It consists of three key components: a transaction, a transaction record and a system that verifies and stores the transaction. The blocks are generated through open-source software and record the information about when and in what sequence the transaction took place.

This “block” chronologically stores information of all the transactions that have taken place in the chain, thus the name blockchain. In other words, blockchain is a database of immutable time-stamped information of every transaction that is replicated on servers across the globe. This technology is the foundation of bitcoin, a crypto currency.

In traditional transactions such as money transfers or foreign currency, there is usually an intermediary or a centralized entity that records the transmission of money or currency that exist apart from it. In blockchain, the token or digital coin itself is what has value, which is determined by the market. This is what makes the system a truly decentralized exchange. When people buy or sell cryptocurrency, a secret key or token is broadcast to the system. “Miners” use nodes, computers or devices linked to a network, to identify and validate the transaction using copies of all or some information of the blockchain.

Before the transaction is accepted by the network, miners have to show “proof of work” using a cryptographic hash function –a special algorithm- that aims to provide high levels of protection. Miners receive some form of compensation for their computing power contribution, avoiding the need to have a centralized system.

New protocols such as Ripple rely on a consensus process that does not need miners nor proof of work and can agree on the changes to the blockchain within seconds.

In any case, the blockchain offers an inherent level of trust for the user, eliminating the need for the middleman and mitigating the risk of human error. In this public ledger, the data is protected against tampering and revision, and individuals cannot replace parts of the blockchain as the cost of doing so is significant – hypothetically one would need to control more than half of the “nodes” to surreptitiously alter the block chain.

The Disruption

While cryptocurrency itself has received a lot of criticism, the blockchain technology is thought to offer great potential, attracting the attention of governments, businesses and venture capital at a rapid pace. Some ideas developed in recent years include a pay-as-you-go system that allows users to stream live video; a structure that allows sharing space-program information; or ways to record business information such as audits. In most cases, these options are thought to offer greater security, speed and reliability at a fraction of the cost of more traditional infrastructures.

Other ideas include the possibility to create digital identities that could substitute dozens of usernames and passwords while offering greater security features; and “smart contracts” with self-executing properties that would make the contract “unbreakable”.

In the financial industry, institutions are slow to recognize the potential of blockchain technology; however, dozens of large banks have now invested significant amounts of money in this technology.

The attention is likely the result of how disruptive this technology is to the financial sector, particularly if it allows massive simplification of banking processes and significantly reduces costs.

The first levels of disruption seem more likely in payment processing where traditional transactions such as money transfers, credit and debit card payments, remittances, foreign currency and online payments, require an intermediary such as a clearing house or a financial institution.

In these cases the transaction would occur directly between the buyer and the seller without any intermediary and the validation of the transaction would happen in a decentralized way or “distributed ledger”. This would result in significant infrastructure savings for banks by allowing them to bypass payment networks that are oftentimes slow, cumbersome, and expensive.

However, the biggest potential impact of a public ledger may extend beyond the payment system. Given that the majority of financial assets such as bonds, equities, derivatives and loans are already electronic it may be possible that someday the entire system is replaced by a decentralized structure.

In fact, the latest innovations are using tokens to store and trade assets like shares, bonds, cars, houses and commodities. These so-called “colored coins” attach additional information on the asset, generating “smart property” or the ability to record and transact these assets using “smart contracts”, which are enforced by complex algorithms, through distributed platforms without a centralized register, thereby increasing efficiency.

In this environment, the current system where financial institutions record individuals’ accounts in a centralized fashion and the banks’ reserves are stored by the central bank (i.e. Federal Reserve) would be replaced by the “Internet of money” or the “Internet of finance” – a fully decentralized financial system.

As other industries that have been transformed by new technologies and digitization, blockchain technology could reshape the financial industry well beyond the payments system.

A large accumulation of small defeats

A large accumulation of small defeats

The measures to curb air pollution in Delhi must necessarily tackle the city’s solid-waste crisis as well


Landfills release noxious methane fumes into the air and leachates into the groundwater, presenting a permanent challenge to tackling pollution in cities. Yet landfills continue to be overlooked by flagship policies. Photo: Bloomberg

The toxic haze that enveloped Delhi for two weeks after Diwali has diminished. But it would be foolhardy to think the moment has passed. How do we go on from here, knowing that next year, too, farmers will burn crop stubble, people will burn garbage and burst Diwali firecrackers, diesel generators will remain in use, environmentally harmful industry practices will prevail and private vehicles will still be the preferred means of transport?

The causes of October’s smog highlight the intersectional nature of pollution in cities—how one mode of pollution interacts with and worsens another, which is why it is difficult to come up with a quick fix to bad air. The measures to curb air pollution in Delhi must necessarily tackle the city’s solid-waste crisis as well.

India produces about 62 million tonnes of solid waste annually, of which 75-80% is collected, and only 22-28% is treated. The rest lands up in open dumpyards and landfills or is burnt. According to a 2016 study by the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, on Delhi’s air quality, the burning of municipal solid waste accounts for 7-8% of particulate matter pollution. Landfills, on the other hand, release noxious methane fumes into the air and leachates into the groundwater, presenting a permanent challenge to tackling pollution in cities. Yet landfills continue to be overlooked by flagship policies. The Swachh Bharat (Urban) scheme focuses on water, sanitation and hygiene, with scant attention being paid to the solid waste coagulating unchecked in landfills. The National Urban Sanitation Policy 2008 was concerned with access to sanitation facilities for the urban poor, but landfills remained outside that conversation. Landfills were limited to the ambit of the erstwhile Municipal Solid Wastes (Management and Handling Rules), 2000.

Every big city usually has at least one landfill. Delhi has four. Mumbai has three. Chennai and Kolkata have two each. Bengaluru had two before they were shut down after community protests. There is something very sobering about the vastness of a landfill, the spectre of city after city struggling with the problem. But the bigger issue is that landfills continue to be the solution, both for untreated municipal solid waste and for the scores of workers in the informal economy seeking to make a living in cities.

It is easier to not see both solid waste and the informal worker, because we still haven’t arrived at a development narrative that will accommodate both. Solid waste is the by-product of a consumption economy. The informal worker exists outside the regulated, legal, organized economy. Both exist on the outer fringes of a city’s growth story. Both converge on the landfill.

The economic potential of municipal waste in Indian cities is fettered by inadequate segregation of waste, thereby rendering it unfit for conversion into refuse-derived fuel. Waste-to-energy incinerator plants are still an inefficient response to solid-waste management because municipal waste is marked by high moisture content (up to 65%) and low calorific value (520-3,766kcal/kg), which means that things don’t burn well enough to generate the energy that would justify the plant.

A worker in the informal economy poses a tougher challenge. Urban areas account for 28% of employment and 55% of the output, according to a 2014 study by the Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bengaluru. It found that employment generation in cities has taken place largely in the informal sector, where the quality of work is poor, with low wages and little social protection. The National Commission for Enterprises in the Unorganized Sector, 2009, describes a class of “socially discriminated, educationally deprived, and economic destitutes”, for whom the growth process has yielded “very little expansion of their employment and enhancement in their earning capacity”. Since waste workers tend to hail from the most marginalized castes in India, caste, gender and age intersect in such a way that the burden of making a living from landfills falls disproportionately on women and children.

On the bright side, the recently notified Solid Waste Management Rules, 2016, emphasize segregation of waste at source and greater decentralized processing of biodegradable waste. They also mandate the integration of kabadiwallahs and ragpickers into the formal economy. This is vitally important since most of the waste-sorting and recycling is done by informal workers before the unrecyclable waste is transported to a landfill. They bear the brunt of our failure to segregate our household waste; they do so under hazardous conditions and for negligible pay.

A landfill is a fracture in the stories we tell about our cities. The home page of the urban development ministry website carries a permanent declaration—“The growth story of India shall be written on the canvas of planned urban development.” Almost as an afterthought, there is a second declaration, “And shall be scripted through the instrument of planned mobility.”

What stories come out of landfills? They are reports of the landfill fires that continually smoulder, the deaths of ragpickers, the tonnage of waste being dumped, the dreary profiles of municipal waste. They remain narrative versions of things that you don’t look at directly or for too long. The presence and persistence of landfills ought not to be taken lightly when contending with air pollution.

We need to move towards environmentally sound policymaking, and away from the formulaic inter-governmental squabble that seems to pass for crisis management. Without this, a city, as Jeet Thayil describes in Narcopolis, isn’t much more than “a large accumulation of small defeats”.

Rihan Najib is a staff writer at Mint.

Mike Prettyman,
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
For more information come to the website

Children of the Landfill Project

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

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United States Congress Supports Resolution Promoting Blockchain

 Author Jacob Timp

The United States House of Representatives has passed a nonbinding resolution calling for an adoption of “a national policy for technology to promote consumers' access to financial tools and online commerce to promote economic growth and consumer empowerment.”

Why The Accelerated Interest?

We have seen relatively little developments in the space of federal regulation on the Blockchain technology and digital currencies. A non-profit called Coin Center reached out to United States representatives communicating their concerns on the developing bill. The letters on issue are available on their website.

In July, the declaration was introduced which calls the United State government to develop an updated domestic policy related to technology, specifically referencing cryptocurrencies and Blockchain technology. The bill was introduced by United States Congressman Adam Kinzinger of Illinois and is sponsored by Congressman Tony Cardenas of California.

Following statements from supporters, the resolution passed by a verbal vote earlier this week. The resolution is non-binding, which may be considered a half-measure, is a rather significant leap forward from Congress for the discussion on Blockchain and cryptocurrencies.

The opening remarks on the bill stated:

“The House of Representatives that the United States should adopt a national policy for technology to promote consumers’ access to financial tools and online commerce to promote economic growth and consumer empowerment.”

The resolution occurred months after the United States House Committee on Energy and Commerce debated the technology. Notes from supporters on the floor demonstrated a very real interest in the issue among the House members.

Congressman Michael Burgess of Texas, stated at the hearing:

"There’s no doubt that Blockchain innovations are on the cutting edge today."

What’s Next?

We will see what the next step is for congress and whether or not they will pursue a more substantial bill development for digital currencies and the Blockchain technology. The next session will meet after November's United States elections.

The non-leaning characteristics of the current resolution suggests that a new and updated bill may be released by Congress in the time following.

Mike Prettyman,
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
For more information come to the website

Children of the Landfill Project

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Green Fire and Landfill Mining

Green Fire and Landfill Mining

Landfill Mining – LFM – has the potential to have significant economic and environmental impacts. Historic landfill sites have many unquantifiable variables and estimates must be made of the wastes within them and the subsequent impacts that those wastes may have. It is only in recent years that accurate knowledge, and then only in broad terms, is available to assess what wastes a landfill site may contain.

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation is a landfill mining company.

Green Fire is a passionate multi disciplinary professional organization specializing in carefully engineered waste remediation and reclamation.

We could be considered a high tech company with the innovations we are working with but a better term would be an all tech company. Green Fire carefully choses the best technology to use for any given application based on properly engineered and tested processes. Every project is a little different. This is why Green Fire is made up of entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists and academic experts.

Landfill Mining

As available land and reusable resources become increasingly scarce, options to harness these from alternative sources become more sought after. One of the options available is Landfill Mining (LFM).

LFM is commonly understood to be the extraction of waste from a landfill site after that site has closed and is no longer accepting waste. Green Fire is preemptive in its approach, we want to be there before it closes, Our mission is to not only recover the land but reclaim and reuse the waste. Green Fire intercepts and stems the flow of waste to the landfill.

The concept of LFM is not new: There have been examples cited since the later 1940s and it is likely that earlier, unrecorded activities took place.

LMF is not a practice unique to one country, region or has any specific strategy that determines whether it should take place or not.

Traditionally the reasons for LFM are often unique to the site itself and there are specific factors that may lead to a LFM operation. Green Fire is mining the proportion of the world’s waste still being disposed of in open landfills. Open landfills have the potential for significant resources to be recovered post-disposal. In the future old landfills are likely to be considered as exploitable material resources.

Green Fire; LFM, Economics and Humanity

While there are a number of reasons for Green Fire LFM, It appears that there are four main strategic reasons for these operations:

  • Extraction recycling potential;

  • extraction for energy recovery;

  • the reclamation of land; and

  • solving the humanitarian condition of the landfill.

While the first two are clear economic arguments about the potential income from the deposited wastes, the third has greater potential for considering environmental sustainability and the forth, the greatest reclamation of them all, reclaiming the children that live on the landfill.

These reasons may be independent purposes for LFM but are being combined to deliver wider benefits and maximize the LFM opportunity.

The Need For Green Fire LFM

The reasons covered by the broad term ‘landfill reclamation’ may include one or a combination of the following:

  • There is need to recover arable land from landfill sites

  • The landfill site may form a physical barrier to the metropolitan expansion and development that is planned,

  • It may be contaminating the groundwater or surrounding area and the source requires removal;

  • There is need to reclaim the lives of the poor women and children that only have the dump as life’s hope

  • There is need for reclaiming the waste for reuse.

  • There is need to recover reusable raw materials, precious and non-precious

  • There is need to convert waste to energy

Materials and energy recovery are likely to be the primary economic factors, land reclamation may be driven by environmental reasoning but the Children of the Landfill and improving their lives is a critical factor for Green Fire.

Green Fire Landfill Mining

Green Fire extracts the wastes for their material values in the market place. Metals and plastics are those materials which have the highest values and the lowest level of degradation within a landfill site. These are essential targets for LFM. However, there are other materials that have a specific local value. All non-marketable materials are 99% pure and sterile. These materials are reused to provide for the Children of the Landfill.

Recovery of material for conversion to energy, extracts the value of the hydrocarbon portion of the waste turning it into fuels. While not a ‘renewable’ source of energy in the purest sense, with dwindling fossil fuels and the need for more sustainable use of natural resources, the Green Fire processing of landfill waste provides a low cost local resolution to energy demand.

When the widest range of benefits is considered, the greatest humanitarian benefits can be derived from a Green Fire LFM operation. Green Fire will have a significant social impact and will have significant economic and environmental impacts on the Children of the Landfill.

The Value in Landfills

Historic landfill sites have many unquantifiable variables and estimates must be made of the wastes within them and the subsequent impacts that those wastes may have. It is only in recent years that accurate knowledge, and then only in broad terms, is available to assess what wastes a landfill site may contain. There will always be uncertainty of value in what LFM will produce.

A Green Fire Engineered LFM project is always safe, and 100% effective with waste remediation and reclamation while providing humanitarian aid to the “ Children of the Landfill:.

I appreciate your attention

Mike Prettyman

For more information come our websites
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

Children of the Landfill Project
Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

ISWA calls open dumps a global health emergency

ISWA calls open dumps a ‘global health emergency’

A new report by the International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) is highlighting the ‘global health emergency’ affecting tens of millions of people in developing countries who lack good sanitation infrastructure. 

 

The front page of ‘Wasted health, the tragic case of open dumps’

The report, ‘Wasted health: The tragic case of dumpsites’, illustrates how the issues surrounding open dumpsites in the developed world 40 years ago are still prevalent in developing countries, but are also being compounded by unprecedented issues such as the unregulated accumulation of discarded electronics, mobile phones, and medical waste. 

Some of the main problems identified in the report include:

  • open dumpsites receive roughly 40 per cent of the world’s waste and serve about 3.5 to 4 billion people;
  • there has been a substantial rise in unregulated dumping of mobile devices, electronic appliances, medical and municipal waste, accelerating the scale of the threat and health risks;
  • uncontrolled burning of waste releases gases and toxins into the atmosphere;
  • open waste sites in India, Indonesia and the Philippines are more detrimental to life expectancy than malaria;
  • 64 million people’s lives (equal to the population of France) are affected by world’s 50 largest dumpsites;
  • in addition to the human and environmental impacts, the financial cost of open dumpsites runs into the tens of billions of US dollars.

Report’s statistics

In preparing the report, researchers analysed 373 toxic waste sites in India, Indonesia and the Philippines, where, the report says, ‘an estimated 8.6 million people are at risk of exposure to lead, asbestos, hexavalent chromium and other hazardous materials’. 

It continues: ‘Among those people at risk, the exposure could cause a loss of around 829,000 years of good health as a result of disease, disability or early death. In comparison, malaria in these countries, whose combined population is nearly 1.6 billion, causes the loss of 725,000 healthy years.’

The report also states that over 42 million tonnes of e-waste was generated in 2014 and a lack of trained labour and investment in recycling infrastructure has meant that much of the waste is simply dumped in open landfills, which can lead to further health issues as they can be burnt, exposing locals to dangerous pollutants, heavy metals, volatile compounds and soot.

Call for a ‘global alliance’ to address the issue

Releasing the report, Antonis Mavropoulos, Chairman of the ISWA Scientific and Technical Committee and author of the report, called for immediate action: “Little or no coordinated action is being taken at present and to be effective change can only happen if there is a global alliance to address the issue among governments and key stakeholder organisations.

“We need to start with a plan of how we finance the closure and relocation of the most dangerous sites urgently and provide support through resources of capital and expertise. While the cost will be substantial, it represents an opportunity to invest in the infrastructure and economy of these emerging and poor nations. In addition, the outlay required to close the most risky dumpsites will be just a small fraction of the cost of their health impacts.” 

David Newman, ISWA President, said: “The recommendations of this report are clear:  the international community has an urgent task ahead in closing waste dumps globally, for the sake of populations affected by them, because they live in or near them, but also because all the world’s people are breathing in the toxins released by burning on open dumps. And the greenhouse gas emissions involved are huge too, and unless we act, the growth of open dumping is inevitable.”

He added: “ISWA and its experts are willing to take part in this global clean up and will, with other interested parties, collaborate on drawing attention to the damage caused to human health through poor waste management practices.”

 The full report is available on ISWA’s website

VISION CARE ORPHAN HOME – A Children of the Landfill client

VISION CARE ORPHAN HOME – A “Children of the Landfill” client

The Green Fire mission here is to enhance their already existing program.

 

Here is an overview of the conditions these orphanages address.

At the beginning of the 21st Century the children of the world are facing an undeclared assault upon their childhood as they suffer as a result of poverty, sexual exploitation, abuse as well as becoming the innocent victims of wars and the HIV/AIDS epidemics.Ten years ago the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child was adopted and the UN Secretary General has stated “we have no higher priority, no prouder achievement, than our work for the rights of children!”

A few facts indicate it may be a little early “for we the people” to be proud of our achievement:

    • 12 million children die before reaching their fifth year

    • 100 million homeless children living in the streets around the world.

    • 250,000 children die every week from diseases and malnutrition.

    • 2 million children are objects of sexual abuse – child pornography and demand for  child prostitutes has increased globally.

    • 20 million children are refugees or internally displaced in their homeland.

    • 10 million children are child slaves.

    • Millions of girls are ‘missing’ as a result of foeticide, infanticide and neglect.

    • Millions of children spend their whole life surviving on a landfill

Millions of children are being orphaned as their parents die of AIDS related illnesses.The figures are unimaginable – already 11 million children in sub-Saharan Africa alone have been orphaned by the AIDS epidemic and reliable sources estimate that by 2010 there will be more than 30 million children orphaned by AIDS decimating parents.

Credit: Womenaid International, http://www.womenaid.org/wcwi.htm

Their is a very clear reason and purpose in “Children of the Landfill” mission, the children.

Green Fire plans to bring education and commerce to these children.
Mike Prettyman
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

I present you with an article I just received from the head of VISION CARE ORPHAN HOME, an orphanage in Uganda.

VISION CARE ORPHAN HOME

Introduction:

In our project area number of Orphans, Semi Orphans and Street Children are found. The problem of orphans / street children is acute due to the Allied Democratic Force Rabbles insurgence, Natural hazards, urbanization and industrialization. Due to the deaths of HIV/AIDS affected persons, Re-marriage of deserted / widowed / divorce women, absence of love and security in the families, Family disputes, Unwanted pregnancy of Trafficking / Sexually exploited girls; these orphan and street children are left without care and support. These children are involved in rag picking; pick pocketing and participating in anti social, criminal activities. Therefore, we envisage mainstreaming these children in the national building by providing care, support and protection in our Vision Care Orphan Children Home.

History Background

Vision Care Orphanage is located in Musasa Village-kyondo sub count Kasese District Rewenzori sub region of Uganda.

The history of this orphanage center is so sad after it had its roots in the early 90's During the time of the Allied Democratic Forces insurgence in our region (mountain Rwenzori Slopes),These rabbles killed many people in these hills of the Rwenzori mountains, so my grandmother Constance Kamalha who was a natural birth attendant was one day hosting pregnant mothers at her house when rabbles attacked and Killing 15 women who had just given birth.

Constance had nothing to do but to take care of the new born babies whose mothers had just been killed with the help of Red cross and the Catholic parish around the village, it was by God mercy that she was left alone, so her home ended up becoming an orphanage center. When she died in 2003, this orphanage collapsed.

In 2012 when I completed the university, with the help of my parents, I decided to begin a small orphanage center to fulfill the dream of my fallen grandmother.

Our Mission:

Mainstreaming the Orphan, Semi Orphan and Street children in the national building by providing care, support & protection through shelter, food, and education is our mission.

The Project – An Overview:

The project proposed in this scheme is meant for additional support to run the orphan children home.

This orphanage home is aiming to provide care, support and protection for 150 but so far 37orphan & street children. This home has three Care Takers; a doctor is conducting health check-up & providing medicines. All the inmates (child residents) are being provided with 3 time’s nutritious food, one set of books and 2 sets of uniforms and school fees.

Every child has opportunity for indoor and out-door recreation and play facilities along with training in crafts and hobbies.

What is the issue, problem, or challenge?

The problem of orphan/ street children is acute due to urbanization and industrialization. Recent floods in our area aggravated the situation further when most people lost lives.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ub4uAqkeL3Y

Due to the Deaths of AIDS affected persons, Re-marriage of Widowed/ Divorced women, Absence of love and security, Unwanted pregnancy of Sexually exploited girls; these orphan & street children are left without care and support.

These children are involved in rag picking, pick pocketing & participating in anti social, criminal activities.

How will this project solve this problem?

We have identified orphans & street children & providing food and education facilities for all children with the help of you the sponsors.

We are arranging teaching facilities in nearby schools & providing home tuitions, health check-up, medicines, cosmetics, one set of books & 2sets of uniform every year.

Every child is being provided with nutritional diet, indoor & outdoor recreation and play facilities and training in crafts and hobbies.

Potential Long Term Impact

This project has potential & impact full in main streaming of orphans & street children. Their basic needs are met & they will get new life through gaining knowledge, vocational skills & life skills. They will get love & affection as if their parents provides. Their confidence level will increase & become good asset to the community. They are developed physically & psychologically & made as good & productive citizens. They will inspire by philanthropy & show humanity towards the community.

Some testimonials from the orphans

“I regained my birth. I obtained nutritious food, quality education & resourceful life.”

“I got love & affection through my colleagues & organizers in the orphan home.”

Orphan Beneficiary Project Objectives:

  • To provide orphan / semi orphan / street children, a childhood that they never experienced and help them to become useful members of the society.

  • To encourage orphan / semi orphan / street children to kindle their potential by providing creative opportunities

  • To make available a secure place where orphan / semi orphan / street children can play and enjoy their childhood.

  • To provide basic education to orphan / semi orphan / street children

  • To provide such welfare services like free lodging, boarding, health and recreation

  • To provide basic literacy and facilities for those who wish to study further

  • To select and prepare for a vocation in order to live on their own legs

  • To accomplishing physical, intellectual and aesthetic development of the child Project Activities:

  • Identification of orphan / semi orphan / street children

  • Pre-view of the incoming orphan / semi orphan / street children problem/difficulties

  • Emotional acceptance of the child

  • Teaching facilities for basic education

  • Teaching facilities for vocational courses and crafts

  • Lodging and boarding facilities for all inmates

  • Recreational facilities

  • Primary health

I appreciate your attention

Mike Prettyman, For more information come to the website
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

Children of the Landfill Project

Landfills are a huge greenhouse gas generators

The Global Situation

Landfill gases have an influence on climate change. The major components are CO2 and methane, both of which are greenhouse gas. In terms of global warming potential, methane is over 25 times more detrimental to the atmosphere than carbon dioxide. Landfills are the third largest source of methane in the US.

Biomass derived CO and CO 2 from landfills is not “counted” as contributing to global warming by the world organizations.

Globally, trash released nearly 800 million metric tons of CO2 equivalent in 2010 — about 11 percent of all methane generated by humans. The United States had the highest total quantity of methane emissions from landfills in 2010: almost 130 million metric tons of CO2 equivalent. China was a distant second, with 47 million then Mexico, Russia, Turkey, Indonesia, Canada, the United Kingdom, Brazil and India, according to the Global Methane Initiative, an international partnership of government and private groups working to reduce methane emissions.

Our landfill problems contribute directly to climate change. As organic material such as food scraps break down in a landfill, they eventually release methane into the atmosphere.

Methane from landfill sites account for 12% of total global methane emissions and almost 5% of total greenhouse gas emissions.

The Personal Situation

We all take out our trash and feel lighter and cleaner. This statement includes everyone in the world.

But at the landfill, the food and yard waste that trash contains is decomposing and releasing methane, a greenhouse gas that’s 28 times more potent than carbon dioxide. Landfill gas contributes to smog, worsening health problems like asthma.

The Solution

Green Fire does not try to capture the gases of the landfill, we change the conditions of the dump to reduce landfill greenhouse gas emissions.

Green Fire processes all hydrocarbons on the landfill reducing them to useful fuels. These fuels are used to generate electricity to feed back into the local grid. The byproduct from the gasification process is carbon. Carbon can be used to "quite" a landfill by spreading it on fires and spreading it to absorb a great many toxins.

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation has developed new ways to reclaim and recycle waste by producing fuels to generate electricity and reusable raw materials from landfill waste.

Green Fire and its "Green" and "renewable" resources doesn't produce pollution in the process of reclamation and making energy. Our "Green Power" has no environmentally-damaging emissions.

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation, a most extraordinary reclamation company, has a solution for landfill pollution.

Green Fire is the sponsor of the "Children of the Landfill" project.

Read more: http://greenfireeng.com

Mike Prettyman
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

Introducing Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation

Green Fire is a passionate multi-disciplinary organization specializing in carefully engineered waste Remediation and Reclamation.

A number of years ago our group came together with a focus on developing ways of economically resolving the global epidemic of health risks facing society from its mounting waste. The result is Green fire Engineered Reclamation.

Green Fire Engineered Reclamation is an engineering company, made up of entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists and academic experts focused on the world's waste problem, initially the open landfills.

We pride ourselves on our ability as a collective group to integrate all appropriate technologies, Green Fire's as well as third party technologies. We integrate technologies to build the best possible solution for the landfill and the local community.

We are focused on landfill mining. With our technologies we are able to reclaim and re-purpose the landfill by removing the raw and useful materials from what has been rejected as waste, producing only inert material to be used for new purposes.

Here is the problem we are addressing.

Open Dumpsites

Open Dumpsites are a global problem. There are approximately 350 recognized open dump sites globally. They receive roughly 40% of the world’s waste and they serve about 3.5 – 4 billion people. That's half of the world's population.

The 50 biggest dumpsites directly affect the daily lives of 64 million people, a population the size of France.

There have been and still are international calls for solutions to solve this escalating global health emergency. Green Fire has the solution.

 

What we do is process the waste through the “application of heat.”

Green Fire has a patented technology several years in development and with several million dollars invested.. It is now ready to be taken into useful production.

The Green Fire Technology is an efficient electrochemical system powered by electricity that produces an intense field of radiant energy, a plasma, that causes the breaking apart of the molecular bonds of solid, liquid and gaseous compounds of materials both hazardous and nonhazardous.

Our process is a two stage process.

The first transforms the organic (carbon-based) materials into an ultra-clean, synthetic gas, called syngas. The clean syngas is then converted into transportation fuels such as ethanol and diesel, or industrial products like hydrogen and methanol. The syngas is used as a substitute for natural gas for heating and is used for electrical generation.

After the first phase, the waste materials flow into a second closed chamber where they are superheated using an electricity – conducting gas called plasma.

In this secondary stage of the Green Fire process, inorganic (non-carbon-based) materials are transformed into environmentally inert raw materials.

That brings us to the recovered materials

The recovered materials are used with appropriate technologies that include 3D Printing for site specific manufacturing and fabrication. The ultimate focus is to create a local manufacturing business for the betterment of community commerce.

Green Fire provides the education and training to local qualified individuals and professionals. All education provided is supported by a mentoring program until a comfort level for independent operations has been reached at which point support and oversight will be minimizes to an as needed basis.

We build small low cost villages with our processes and materials. We provide designs to manufacture low cost housing for the local village.

Our villages are designed for a population range from 50 to 150 individuals, although some are smaller, and larger villages of up to 2,000 individuals can exist as networks of smaller sub-communities.

These villages are provided electricity, fuels and clean water utilities as well as training and communication systems from Green Fire operations.

Green Fire Villages are intentional villages whose goal is to become completely autonomous and more socially, economically and environmentally safe.

Who lives in these initial villages?

Most important inhabitants are the Landfill Pickers that already populate the landfill, then Green Fire staff and employees,and the additional community support personnel such as medical, and emergency staff.

It is the people of the village that provide the labor for Green Fire operations.

There are approximately 30 million people who directly survive on and make the landfill an integral part of their lifestyle. These people have formed and are a part of a global organization of Landfill Pickers. The Landfill Pickers are the initial target of Green Fire.

It is our mission to enhance the living standard of these people and the surrounding communities.

Green Fire is dedicated to the children living and existing on the landfills around the world. The humanitarian project Green Fire sponsors for this task is called the “Children of the Landfill” project. We are crowd funding and will introduce the campaign in a few days.

In summary:

1. Landfill dumpsites are a significant health hazard in many locations around the world and influences about one half of the world's population

2. Green Fire builds a facility which with the use of our technology converts landfill dump site contents into useful by products

3. The output of the process has many potential uses, one of which is to use the material in a 3D printer to create pre-fab housing material which initially will be used to assemble self-sustaining housing for the workers at the landfill.

4. Other outputs are clean electricity, fuels and inert raw materials.

If you believe that my message is worth spreading, please use the share buttons if they show on this page.

Mike Prettyman
Chief Information Officer at Green Fire Engineered Reclamation
Green Fire Engineered Reclamation