Please allow me to remind you

Please allow me to remind you … (self.Bitcoin)

submitted 10 hours ago by brahim789

Guys, please allow to me remind you that any innovative idea is almost always welcomed with skepticism/hostility by those who have much to lose from its success.

Take the example of cars. In the past, when the first cars were created, the railway and stagecoach industry used all their weight to put pressure on the authorities to prohibit them. You know, using the same well-known sneaky technique of the capitalist: the manipulation of opinion. They tried to convince people that the car was too dangerous for people and frightened the horses. They managed to pass a law in 1865 in England that restricted their use only to a crew composed of : a driver, an engineer and a human horn (a man with a flag that warns people of the arrival of the car .. knowing that the car was limited to a speed of 4 miles per hour.)

And there are many other examples you probably know. So we should be glad to see the authorities try to slow down the bitcoin because this shows that this technology is following the same pattern as all the innovative technologies that improve the daily lives of peoples and here to stay for a long time. So, i want to say thank you to China. Please go further in your bitcoin prohibition.

Mike Prettyman Chief Information Officer Green Fire Engineered Reclamation Member GreenFire DAO Whatsapp only Phone: 1-602-315-1571 Skype: mike.prettyman Website: http://greenfirefunding.com email: greenfirereclamation@gmail.com

China Begins Resetting The World’s Reserve Currency System – Crude Oil for Gold

By  on September 6, 2017

China Begins Resetting The World's Reserve Currency System

China Begins Resetting The World’s Reserve Currency System

$GLD, $OIL, $CNY

It is a strategic move swapping Crude Oil for Gold, rather than for US Treasuries, which can be printed at will.

A report released by the Nikkei Asian Review indicates that China is prepared to release a RMB Yuan denominated Crude Oil futures contract that is convertible, aka backed by physical Gold.

The contract will enable China’s largest Crude Oil suppliers to settle Crude Oil sales in RMB Yuan, rather than in USDs, and then convert the RMB Yuan into Gold on exchanges in Hong Kong and Shanghai.

This is a significant step in removing the global reserve currency status of USD, and resetting the global economic and geopolitical “landscape.”

Over the past several years, China has quietly established RMB Yuan-based currency exchange facilities, which has set up the ability to implement this new non-USD trade settlement financial instrument.

According to the Brookings Institute, 34 Central Banks around the world have signed bi-lateral local currency swap agreements with the PBOC (Peoples Bank of China) as of the end of September 2016, including the major Crude Oil-producing countries.

With this new contract, China’s largest Crude Oil suppliers will now be able to transact directly with China, and other Crude Oil importing countries, using RMB Yuan which are directly convertible into Gold to settle the trade.

This is a mechanism which is likely to appeal to Crude Oil producers that prefer to avoid using USDs, and are not ready to accept that being paid in RMB Yuan for Crude Oil sales to China is a good idea yet.

Since Y 1973, OPEC Crude Oil has been quoted and traded using USDs, otherwise known as “Petrodollars.”

The “recycling” of petrodollars into US Treasuries has been the life-blood of the US economic and political system. In addition to reducing a major source of funding for the US Government’s enormous deficit spending, the introduction of a Gold-backed RMB Yuan Crude Oil futures contract is an important step toward removing the USD as the world’s reserve currency.

More significantly it re-introduces Gold into the global monetary system.

As the new Gold-backed “Petroyuan” will allow Crude Oil producers to sell Crude Oil for Gold rather than US Treasuries.

Furthermore, it reduces the ability of the US Government to impose its will on the rest of the world. And is a strategic step toward not only ridding the world of its dependence on USDs.

And it also reduced the ability of the US to exert global economic and financially tyranny.

I would also argue that it is 1 of the primary reasons behind the inability of the Western Central Banks to drive the price of Gold lower recently. And they have tried, and tried, and tried.

By Dave Kranzler

 

By Paul Ebeling

 

 

Mike Prettyman Chief Information Officer Green Fire Engineered Reclamation Member GreenFire DAO Whatsapp only Phone: 1-602-315-1571 Skype: mike.prettyman Website: http://greenfirefunding.com email: greenfirereclamation@gmail.com

A Tsunami Hits the Recycling World, and We’ll All Feel it Soon

A Tsunami Hits the Recycling World, and We’ll All Feel it Soon

 August 22nd, 2017

David Baggs David Baggs

Whether you felt it or not, the earth shaking actions that unfolded recently will ultimately have an impact on every one of us.

Late last month, China notified the World Trade Organization that by the end of 2017 it will ban imports of 24 types of rubbish as part of a campaign against "foreign garbage" and environmental pollution.

Anyone who cares for the planet or is a ratepayer or who relies on kerbside recycling or a reliable supply of commonly recycled plastics for manufacturing will likely sooner or later be affected by the additional costs and environmental burdens that this recent decision by China will create in the short to medium term while the developed world waste processing and manufacturing industries change gears and re-establishes recyclate reprocessing for use in their products. The decision creates massive  policy and physical challenges for all levels of government and industry.

The official announcement to the WTO foreshadowed that China will forbid the import of four classes and 24 kinds of solid wastes, including plastics waste from living sources, vanadium slag, unsorted waste paper and waste textile materials.

The major China HS categories being banned include the following types of materials:

  1. Scrap or waste plastic
  2. Waste of wool or of fine or coarse animal hair, including yarn waste but excluding garnetted stock (garnetted textiles are typically waste materials that have been reduces to a fibrous state for reuse in textile manufacturing)
  3. Garnetted stock of wool or of fine or coarse animal hair
  4. Cotton waste (including yarn waste and garnetted stock)
  5. Waste (including noils (short fibres), yarn waste and garnetted stock) of man-made fibres
  6. Used or new rags, scrap twine, cordage, rope and cables and worn out articles of twine, cordage, rope or cables, of textile materials
  7. Slag, dross (other than granulated slag), scalings and other waste from the manufacture of iron or steel
  8. Ash and residues (other than from the manufacture of iron or steel), containing arsenic, metals or their compounds
  9. ‘Other’, including unsorted waste and scrap.

The five types of waste plastics that China is banning have China HS individual codes as shown as below:

  1. 3915100000 – Ethylene polymer scrap and waste
  2. 3915200000 – Styrene polymer scrap and waste
  3. 3915300000 – Vinyl chloride polymer scrap and waste
  4. 3915901000 – Polyethylene terephthalate
  5. 3915909000 – Other related waste plastics.

While it seems the move has not drawn any public comment from Australian trade groups, it has drawn quick criticism from a major US recycling industry trade group, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), which said it would be “devastating” to the global recycling industry and cost thousands of US jobs.

The Washington-based group said the move could cause severe economic harm in the United States, given that one-third of the scrap recycled in the United States is exported, with China being the largest market. That includes 1.42 million tons (3.1 billion pounds) of scrap plastics, worth an estimated $495 million, out of $5.6 billion in scrap commodities exported from the United States to China last year.

Puzzlingly, this move must also have a major impact on Chinese manufacturers and their local and international supply chains, but for previously waste exporting countries, it likely comes both with major challenges and with the proverbial silver lining opportunity.

The Chinese government cites toxicity and environmental pollution as the major reasons for the ban; it no longer wants China to the ‘garbage bin of the world.’ Government and industry in developed nations like Australia now have the major challenges of dealing with the retention of this waste, and the probably once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to use this as the incentive to facilitate a massive expansion of circular economy awareness and application. We need to see incentives to fast-track the establishment of on-shore waste-reprocessing and re-use industrial ecosystems and facilities.

The big questions this raises are ‘what impact will this have on prices?’ and ‘do we have governments and industry with big enough imaginations to move this into the circular economy space in the short time frame that will be needed?’

To the former question, I suspect the answer will be time dependent. In the short term, I imagine an increase in the price of recycled plastic in China from domestic sources, and in the developed world likewise, alongside a glut of unrecycled plastic heading to landfill.

There is now an even more urgent need to eliminate or at the very least dramatically reduce our reliance on single use packaging, and containers and develop new models for product and beverage delivery that focus on re-useable and circular economy solutions. Given this issue hasn’t really hit the mainstream media in Australia, how are we even going to engage the public to commence the behavioural change and expectation management that is going to be necessary for this change to happen?

It is going to be a major challenge for us all.

Mike Prettyman Chief Information Officer Green Fire Engineered Reclamation Member GreenFire DAO Whatsapp only Phone: 1-602-315-1571 Skype: mike.prettyman Website: http://greenfirefunding.com email: greenfirereclamation@gmail.com

In world’s poorest slums, landfills and polluted rivers become a child’s playground | PBS NewsHour

A girl plays with her brother as they search for usable items at junkyard near the Danyingone station in Yangon's suburbs in Myanmar in 2012. Photo by Damir Sagolj/Reuters

A girl plays with her brother as they search for usable items at junkyard near the Danyingone station in the suburbs of Yangon, Myanmar, in 2012. Photo by Damir Sagolj/Reuters

Worldwide, more than 340,000 children under age 5 died from diarrheal diseases in 2013 due to a lack of safe water, sanitation and basic hygiene. That’s 1,000 deaths a day, according to the UN’s statistics. What’s more, the No. 1 killer of children between the ages of one month to 5 years, pneumonia, can also be spread through a lack of hygiene.

Although much improvement has been made in the past decade to aid children across the globe, there are still alarming numbers who do not have access to clean water, proper sanitation or even just a way to clean their hands — especially after coming in contact with waste and feces.

“A gram of feces can contain ten million viruses,” said Sanjay Wijesekera, Chief of Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene, Programme Division at UNICEF. “Many diseases are transmitted by pathogens going from feces to food and fingers and so on, making children ill.”

A boy swims in the polluted waters of the Sabarmati River to dive for offerings thrown in by worshippers in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad in 2010. Photo by Amit Dave/Reuters

One of the most basic hygiene problems that haunt developing communities is lack of adequate toilets. Around the world, about 2.5 billion people do not have proper toilets. Among them, 1 billion people defecate in the open — in fields, bushes and bodies of water — putting themselves and their community in danger of fecal-oral diseases, like hepatitis, cholera and dysentery.

Children are especially susceptible to these diseases when their home and “playgrounds” are overrun with rubbish and human waste. In countries throughout Asia, children can be seen swimming in polluted stagnant waters, digging through trash and playing amid toxic substances at landfills.

“When you have children running around barefeet, then coming in contact with excrete, it’s really easy to catch the worms and this of course impacts their development and growth,” said Dr. Aidan Cronin, Chief of the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) program at UNICEF Indonesia.

A child jumps on the waste products that are used to make poultry feed as she plays in a tannery at Hazaribagh in Dhaka in 2012. Luxury leather goods sold across the world are produced in a slum area of Bangladesh's capital where workers, including children, are exposed to hazardous chemicals and often injured in horrific accidents. Photo by Andrew Biraj/Reuters

A child jumps on the waste products that are used to make poultry feed as she plays in a tannery at Hazaribagh in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in 2012. Luxury leather goods sold across the world are produced in this slum area of Bangladesh’s capital where workers, including children, are exposed to hazardous chemicals and often injured in horrific accidents. Photo by Andrew Biraj/Reuters

Reuters photographers have been capturing scenes like this for the past decade. But even some of the oldest photos in this series picture grisly scenes that, sadly, are still the reality in urban slums today.

Not only do these conditions promote the spread of deadly childhood diseases, another major health problem that affects children’s lives is stunting, often caused by malnutrition but also by intestinal worms and internal inflammation from fecal-oral contamination.

Stunting has become a huge obstacle for many children’s physical and cognitive growth, ultimately affecting their development and ability to learn. In Indonesia alone, nearly 9 million children suffer from stunting, said Cronin.

A child eats breakfast in a garbage dump, where hundreds of people live and make a living by recycling waste and making charcoal, in the Tondo section of Manila December 9, 2007. Photo by Darren Whiteside/Reuters

A child eats breakfast in a garbage dump, where hundreds of people live and make a living by recycling waste and making charcoal, in the Tondo section of Manila, Dec. 9, 2007. Photo by Darren Whiteside/Reuters

In Indonesia, UNICEF have recently launched a campaign called “Tinju Tinja,” which means “punch the poo” in Indonesian, in support of the Government’s five-year plan to have a completely open defecation-free country. In an attempt to engage the urban youth, the campaign has one of the local rock stars, Melanie Subono, literally fighting the “poo monster” as the main image to spearhead the campaign.

“It all starts from acknowledging that [open defecation] is a serious problem,” Cronin said. “The more you engage with communities and work with them with their specific issues, the more sustainable sanitation is.”

Children sitting on a makeshift raft play in a river full of rubbish in a slum area of Jakarta in 2012. Photo by Enny Nuraheni/Reuters

Children sitting on a makeshift raft play in a river full of rubbish in a slum area of Jakarta, Indonesia, in 2012. Photo by Enny Nuraheni/Reuters

One way to help children is through education and schools, said Dr. Jody Heymann, Dean of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and founding director of the WORLD Policy Analysis Center. A lot of progress has been made to make primary schools free and available for children around the world. In Indonesia, UNICEF works through primary schools to teach kids the importance of sanitation and hygiene by putting in clean toilets, hand washing stations and soap so that the kids can form a habit of cleaning.

“I think when we see [these] images, we should be asking not only ‘why isn’t there a playground? What’s leading them to the dump?’” said Heymann. “But the bigger question of what’s keeping them from being in school, gaining education that would give them lifelong opportunity.”

A boy looks on as he collects recyclable materials at a garbage dump in New Delhi in 2006. Photo by Adnan Abidi/Reuters

A boy looks on as he collects recyclable materials at a garbage dump in New Delhi in 2006. Photo by Adnan Abidi/Reuters

A boy plays in a polluted river after school at Pluit dam in Jakarta, Indonesia, June 5, 2009. Photo by Beawiharta/Reuters

A boy plays in a polluted river after school at Pluit dam in Jakarta, Indonesia, June 5, 2009. Photo by Beawiharta/Reuters

Sana, a five-year-old girl, plays on a cloth sling hanging from a signalling pole as smoke from a garbage dump rises next to a railway track in Mumbai in 2012. Photo by Vivek Prakash/Reuters

Sana, a 5-year-old girl, plays on a cloth sling hanging from a signalling pole as smoke from a garbage dump rises next to a railway track in Mumbai, India, in 2012. Photo by Vivek Prakash/Reuters

A child living in a slum plays on a swing under a bridge on the bank of Bagmati River in Kathmandu October 17, 2011. Photo by Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters

A child living in a slum plays on a swing under a bridge on the bank of Bagmati River in Kathmandu, Nepal, Oct. 17, 2011. Photo by Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters

A child swims in a polluted reservoir in Pingba, southwest China's Guizhou province September 2, 2006. Photo by China Daily/Reuters

A child swims in a polluted reservoir in Pingba, in southwest China’s Guizhou province Sept. 2, 2006. Photo by China Daily/Reuters

A boy plays at a garbage dump where hundreds of people stay and make a living out of recycling waste and making charcoal in Tondo, Manila in 2007. Photo by Darren Whiteside/Reuters

A boy plays at a garbage dump where hundreds of people stay and make a living out of recycling waste and making charcoal in the Tondo section of Manila, in 2007. Photo by Darren Whiteside/Reuters

Children play in the fumes of a municipality fumigant sprayer in a slum area in the northeastern Indian city of Siliguri October 5, 2006. Photo by Rupak De Chowdhuri/Reuters

Children play in the fumes of a municipality fumigant sprayer in a slum area in the northeastern Indian city of Siliguri, Oct. 5, 2006. Photo by Rupak De Chowdhuri/Reuters

Waste collector Dinesh Mukherjee, 11, watches his friend jump over a puddle of toxic liquid at the Ghazipur landfill in New Delhi November 10, 2011. Photo by Parivartan Sharma/Reuters

Waste collector Dinesh Mukherjee, 11, watches his friend jump over a puddle of toxic liquid at the Ghazipur landfill in New Delhi Nov. 10, 2011. Photo by Parivartan Sharma/Reuters

A boy swims in the polluted water of the Yamuna River to dive for offerings thrown in by worshippers amidst a dust haze in New Delhi during World Environment Day in 2010. Photo by Reinhard Krause/Reuters

A boy swims in the polluted water of the Yamuna River to dive for offerings thrown in by worshippers amid a dust haze in New Delhi during World Environment Day in 2010. Photo by Reinhard Krause/Reuters

People paddle in the waters of Manila Bay amid garbage during Easter Sunday in Manila April 24, 2011. Photo by Cheryl Ravelo/Reuters

People paddle in the waters of Manila Bay amid garbage in the Philippines’ capital city on Easter Sunday, April 24, 2011. Photo by Cheryl Ravelo/Reuters

Boys collect coconuts thrown in as offerings by worshippers in the waters of the Sabarmati river after the immersion of idols of the Hindu elephant god Ganesh, the deity of prosperity, in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad in 2011. Photo by Amit Dave/Reuters

Boys collect coconuts thrown in as offerings by worshippers in the waters of the Sabarmati River after the immersion of idols of the Hindu elephant god Ganesh, the deity of prosperity, in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad in 2011. Photo by Amit Dave/Reuters

Children of rag-pickers stand amid a heap of garbage on the outskirts of New Delhi in 2006. Photo by Kamal Kishore/Reuters

Children of rag-pickers stand amid a heap of garbage on the outskirts of New Delhi in 2006. Photo by Kamal Kishore/Reuters

In world’s poorest slums, landfills and polluted rivers become a child’s playground | PBS NewsHour.

Source: In world’s poorest slums, landfills and polluted rivers become a child’s playground | PBS NewsHour